Translation Pricing Ups and Downs

Panama-City-Skyline
Like any business, we get a few questions about pricing. Believe it or not, some MLM or network marketing companies shop for the lowest price for their translation services and soon after come to Yavaway to fix up some terrible – horrible – mistakes.
 
As a consumer myself, I do understand that price has a part to play when making a decision.
 
It really hit me this weekend, being Easter weekend. Like many husbands and fathers, I purchase flowers for my wife, mother-in-law, and my little, darling, daring daughter, Angie. Back home in Canada, I would just pick up the phone and place an order, but I live in Panama. Things are always a little different here.
 
So I walk into our local florist to take a look.
 
All the spring flowers, Easter flowers, had the prices crossed out, and INCREASED! Not that subtle.
 
Now being a businessman, I asked the proprietor why he didn’t hide the old price before raising them for Easter? He looked at me like I was crazy.
 
“Who cares? That’s the price,” was basically his answer.
 
“Everyone wants spring flowers at Easter, so I raise my prices. Are you going to go home with a fern?” he said laughing.
 
It’s all about demand. Classic.
 
Yet, it’s the opposite in the translation industry. The higher the demand, the lower the price I offer. Typically, the higher the demand, means that’s a good market.
 
Example in point, while many MLM companies have expanded to the Asian market and are ringing up more sales than in the States, the price for Asian translation has fallen, or kept steady (i.e. not increased).
 
Now, you can take advantage of this upside-down “theory of demand” and pricing at Yavaway, and use the money to get a bigger foothold in your new market.
 
Those who do will be ordering a lot of flowers to present onstage to your new top Asian distributors, which reminds me about that Panamanian florist.
 
I overheard him on the phone, since he had it on speaker-phone mode.
 
“Why did you send a ‘Rest in Peace’ card with the flowers sent to the manager at our new business location? Our new manager there became angry and called me to complain.”
 
I wonder how my florists would handle this complaint.
 
“Señora, siento mucho el error, pero en lugar de enojarse usted debe imaginarse esto – en algún lugar se está realizando un funeral hoy, y tienen flores con una nota que dice”
 
“Felicidades por su nueva ubicación”.
 
Or for you English speakers:
 
“Madam, I’m really sorry for the mistake, but rather than getting angry, you should imagine this: Somewhere there is a funeral taking place today, and they have flowers with a note saying, ‘Congratulations on your new location’.”
 
CHRIS
 
PS: The Top 10 Languages That Reign Online:
 
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